Texas Flag Barn

Life in Texas landscape painting

© Copyright 2015 – Present

Size: 20″w  x 16″ h
Support: Gallery Wrap Stretched Canvas
Description: A landscape oil painting of an old barn with the Texas flag painted on its roof. Part of the “Life in Texas” artwork series. This painting will not need a frame as the painting extends around the edges of the canvas. A Certificate of Authentication hand-signed by the artist is provided for this work of art.

TX Flag Barn painting demo
Not to sale

Purchasing Information

$410

FREE shipping and handling within the U.S.A.

Contact us for international postage and handling.




PayPal Acceptance Mark

All transactions are handled via PayPal, a safe and secure way to make your purchase.


Artist Comments: Texans are a proud bunch and we love our state. This is evident everywhere you go here. It would be rare indeed to travel through the Lone Star State and not see a barn or some other out building painted up with the Texas flag like the one in this painting. And you don’t have to travel far outside the city limits to find one either. This particular barn happens to be a famous landmark on US Hwy 377 just east of Stephenville, Texas.

About The Texas Flag

Lone Star FlagThe Texas flag (a.k.a. the “Lone Star Flag”) was adopted in 1845 when Texas became the 28th state. It is a rectangle that has a width to length ratio of two to three. It contains a vertical blue field of color and two horizontal fields of color, one being white and the other one red. The flag also sports a single white star which is located in the center of the blue field. This lone star represents “ALL of Texas and stands for our unity as one for God, state, and country.” Each color field in the flag symbolizes the following:

  • Blue stands for loyalty
  • White represents purity
  • Red is for bravery

This painting is part of the Life In Texas Series.


Texas Longhorn In The Meadow

Texas longhorn cow painting

© Copyright 2013 – Present

Size: 20″ w x 16″ h
Support: Gallery wrap stretched canvas
Description:  Part of the “Life in Texas” series, this painting of a common ranch animal often seen in the Lone Star State is called the Texas Longhorn. This painting is composed on gallery warp stretched canvas which allows the artist to extend the painted image around the edges of the canvas and will not need a frame before displaying. The artwork comes with an official Certificate of Authentication signed by the artist.

TX longhorn on the meadow demo
Not to scale

Purchasing Information

$410

FREE shipping and handling within the U.S.A.

Contact us for international postage and handling.




PayPal Acceptance Mark

All transactions are handled via PayPal, a safe and secure way to make your purchase.


Artist Comments: The Texas Longhorn is a common breed of registered cattle in Texas. They get their name from the breed’s characteristic long horns. Some sets of horns on these huge bovine can reach a span of 7 feet tip to tip. You simply  have to see one these magnificent animals in person to really appreciate those massive horns. I live in East Texas and there are several longhorn ranches near our small homestead. I love driving past these places and seeing the longhorn grazing and resting in their pastures.

This painting is part of the Life in Texas Collection.

Some Fun Facts About Texas Longhorns

  • The Texas Longhorn is descended from the first cattle brought to America by Christopher Columbus that bred with native cattle. The breed consists of approximately 80 percent Spanish blood and another 20 percent of “mongrel” stock.
  • Texas Longhorns come in all colors and patterns and no two look exactly alike. Their coat pattern can be flamboyant and loud, while others are more subtle in color.
  • Both male and female Longhorns have horns, although they will vary in shape and length according to gender. Longer horns are more desirable. The longer the horns, the more valuable the cow or bull. Calves will begin to grow their horns by 3 weeks of age.
  • There are Texas Longhorn ranches all over America. They is easily adaptable to all temperatures from hot to cold climates. This breed of cattle has the ability to thrive in terrains and climates where other breeds have difficulty living.

Life in Texas — Round Hay Bales

Life in Texas oil painting

© Copyright 2013 – Present

Size: 16″ w x 20″ h
Support: Gallery wrap stretched canvas
Description: A landscape painting of large round hay bales depicting life in East Texas. This painting will not need a frame as the painting extends around the edges of the canvas. The artwork is accompanied by an official Certificate of Authentication signed by the artist.

round hay bales painting demo
Not to scale

Purchasing Information

$410

FREE shipping and handling within the U.S.A.

Contact us for international postage and handling.




PayPal Acceptance Mark

All transactions are handled via PayPal, a safe and secure way to make your purchase.


Artist Comments: This oil painting is part of a series of paintings about what life is like in the great state of Texas. This particular painting is about life in general in the rural areas of East Texas. Cattle ranchers abound here and since cattle and other farm animals need food, we also have a lot of hay farmers. Everywhere you go, if you don’t see cattle or horses grazing in a large pasture, you’ll most likely see hay growing there or you’ll see hay that has been harvested and baled.

Hay farmers harvest their hay using equipment called balers. Balers can bale (package) hay in a variety of ways — small rectangle bales, large square or rectangular bales, or large round bales. The large round bales can weigh anywhere from 800 to over 1,500 pounds! When they are that heavy, they have to be moved around with hay forks attached to tractors. Many cattlemen prefer the round bales as opposed to small rectangle bales as they are less labor intensive to store and move, and easier to feed to their own cattle. They place these large round bales inside hay rings so their cattle and horses can graze on them for days. Small farms and ranches, however, may still use the smaller rectangle hay bales since they have fewer heads of cattle to feed.

This painting is part of the Life In Texas Series.