Test Your Knowledge of Art Appreciation

test your knowledge of artTest your knowledge of fine art appreciation. Take this simple 50 question test by writing your answers on paper, then check your answers at the end of the quiz. Don’t peek!

1. __________ is the expression of human creative skill and imagination.

A.    Emphasis
B.    Contour
C.    Art
D.    Dominance

2. In what way is art important in daily life?

A.    It has personal significance.
B.    It reflects our society.
C.    It records history.
D.    It is used for marketing and advertising.
E.    It is a form of self-expression.
F.    All of the above.

3. The way to do an art critique is to __________.

A.    describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate the piece
B.    talk to the artist
C.    decide if it’s good
D.    write an artist statement


Red Rose paintingTyler Rose
Flower Art by Teresa Bernard
16″ x 12″
Oils on stretched canvas

>> More info


4. A person learning a trade or an art from a skilled worker is called __________.

A.    an apprentice
B.    a mentor
C.    a foreman
D.    a laborer

5. A rule used by artists when planning a good composition.

A.    “Rule of Sketch”
B.    “Rule of Placement”
C.    “Rule of Perspective”
D.    “Rule of Thirds”

6. Andy Warhol, an American painter and filmmaker, is best known for his depiction of what grocery store item?

A.    Apples
B.    Bacon
C.    Tomato Soup
D.    Onions

7. Andy Warhol’s work can best be classified as __________.

A.    realism
B.    pop art
C.    splatterpaint
D,    cubism

8. A style of artwork created using many geometric shapes, often not resembling any object.

A.    Surrealism
B.    Favauvism
C.    Cubism
D.    Baroque

9. An art style where the artist tries to paint a picture exactly how it looks in real life, with as many details as possible.

A.    Impressionism
B.    Pointillism
C.    Realism
D.    Favauvism

10. A style of art where the artist attempts to convey as much of their emotion into the artwork as possible, often using distortion and emphasis.

A.    Expressionism
B.    Surrealism
C.    Cubism
D.    Impressionist

11. The way artwork is arranged is called __________.

A.    emphasis
B.    contour
C.    composition
D.    stylus

12. Surrealism is an art movement which used dream-like images.

True | False


longhorn cow oil paintingTexas Longhorn in the Meadow
Wildlife Art by Teresa Bernard
20″ x 16″
Oils on gallery wrap stretched canvas

>> More info


13. An art style where artwork is extremely detailed and ornate.

A.    Surrealism
B.    Baroque
C.    Favauvism
D.    Expressionism

14. Pablo Picasso is from the country of __________.

A.    Germany
B.    Italy
C.    Spain
D.    United States of America

15. What is the title of the style of painting that Picasso invented?

A.    Realism
B.    Impressionism
C.    Cubism
D.    Art Nouveau

16. Where is the “Mona Lisa” hanging in France?

A.    Gargoyle square
B.    The Louvre
C.    The Eiffel Tower
D.    Chartres Cathedral

17. Van Gogh’s most famous work of art to this day __________.

A.    “The Mona Lisa”
B.    “The Scream”
C.    “Starry Night”
D.    “Poppies”

18. What country was Van Gogh born in?

A.    Holland
B.    France
C.    Spain
D.    United States of America

19. Georgia O’Keeffe was an __________ artist.

A.    English
B.    Italian
C.    American
D.    Australian

20. O’Keeffe is best known for her paintings of  __________.

A.    the sea and marine animals
B.    enlarged flowers and New Mexico landscapes
C.    native American Indians
D.    the Australian Outback

21. Salvador Dali is considered a Surrealist artist.

True | False

22. Salvador Dali was born in India.

True | False

23. Rembrandt is known as an artist of what style?

A.    Impressionists
B.    Baroque
C.    Modern
D.    Prehistoric

24. Rembrandt, considered one of the greatest painters and printmakers in European art, was born in what country?

A.    Netherlands
B.    Switzerland
C.    France
D.    Spain

25. Monet is the father of which movement?

A.    Realism
B.    Impressionism
C.    Cubism
D.    Art Nouveau

26. Where did Monet grow up?

A.    Holland
B.    England
C.    France
D.    United States of America

27. Georges Seurat, the artist who created the painting “Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte”, used which method of art?

A.    Cubism
B.    Pointillism
C.    Abstract
D.    Dadaism

28. “Mona Lisa” was painted by __________.Mona LIsa

A.    Vincent van Gogh
B.    Claude Monet
C.    Picasso
D.    Leonardo da Vinci

29. “Sunflowers” was painted by __________.Sunflowers

A.    Pierre-August Renoir
B.    Vincent van Gogh
C.    Johannes Vermeer
D.    Michelangelo

30. “Poppies in a Field” was painted by __________.Poppies In A Field

A.    Claude Monet
B.    Leonardo da Vinci
C.    Rene Magritte
D.    Johannes Vermeer

31. “The Scream” was painted by __________.The Scream

A.    Vincent van Gogh
B.    Pierre-August Renoir
C.    Edvard Munch
D.    Claude Monet

32. “The Last Supper” was painted by __________.The Last Supper

A.    Leonardo da Vinci
B.    Pierre-August Renoir
C.    Edvard Munch
D.    Michelangelo

33. “Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette” was painted by __________.Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette

A.    Rene Magritte
B.    Picasso
C.    Pierre-August Renoir
D.    Johannes Vermeer

34. “Girl with a Pearl Earring” was painted by __________.Girl with a Pearl Earring

A.    Picasso
B.    Johannes Vermeer
C.    Michelangelo
D.    Edvard Munch

35. “Dance Class” was painted by __________.Dance Class

A.    Claude Monet
B.    Leonardo da Vinci
C.    Edgar Degas
D.    Rene Magritte

36. “Creation of Adam” was painted by __________.Creation of Adam

A.    Michelangelo
B.    Johannes Vermeer
C.    Pierre-August Renoir
D.    Leonardo da Vinci

37. “The Persistence of Memory” was painted by __________.The Persistence of Memory

A.    Johannes Vermeer
B.    Pierre-August Renoir
C.    Salvador Dali
D.    Leonardo da Vinci

38. What does a color wheel show?

A.    Complementary colors
B.    Analogous colors
C.    Primary colors
D.    All of the above

39. Movement in art where hundreds of dots are used to create a picture or painting.

A.    Pointilism
B.    Impressionism
C.    Realism
D.    Abstract

40. The artist Edgar Degas was best known for his paintings of waterlilies.

True | False

41. Edward Degas was a nineteenth-century French artist famous for his paintings, sculptures, prints, and drawings.

True | False

42. Impressionism is a 19th century art movement that mainly focused on the __________.

A.    study of geometric form
B.    study of negative and positive space
C.    study of light on the surface of an object
D.    study of value

43. Art that emerged in the mid-1950s that used imagery from popular culture is termed __________.

A.    Impressionism
B.    Realism
C.    Minimalism
D.    Pop Art

44. A twentieth century non-representational painting style in which artists applied paints freely to express feelings and emotions.

A.    Abstract Expressionism
B.    Fauvism
C.    Pop Art
D.    Cubism

45. Jackson Pollock’s paintings were classified as what?

A.    Realism
B.    Grotesque
C.    Surreal
D.    Splatterpaint

46. Jackson Pollock was an influential American painter and a major figure in what movement?

A.    American Modernism
B.    Pop Art
C.    Abstract Expressionist
D.    Minimalism

47. An English landscape painter of the late eighteenth century, known for his pastoral scenes.

A.    John Constable
B.    Willem de Kooning
C.    Pablo Picasso
D.    Vincent van Gogh

48. Cityscapes, or as it is sometimes called Urban Landscapes, are paintings whose subject matter is the physical aspects of the city and urban life.

True | False

49. A collection of meaningless shapes, texture and colors thrown haphazardly onto a canvas. Its purpose is to let the viewer interpret its meaning for him/herself.

A.    Still Life
B.    Grotesque
C.    Collage
D.    Abstract

50. Naïve Art is works of art characterized by a childlike simplicity that possesses minute detail, bright saturated colors, disproportionate figures and lack of perspective.

True | False

Additional Reading

Know Your Art Painting Styles: 7 Most Popular

What Is Art Appreciation?

Classification Of Fine Art Paintings By Genre


Answers: 1C 2F 3A 4A 5D 6C 7B 8C 9C 10A 11C 12T 13B 14C 15C 16B 17C 18A 19C 20B 21T 22F 23B 24A 25B 26C 27B 28D 29B 30A 31C 32A 33C 34B 35C 36A 37C 38D 39A 40F 41T 42C 43D 44A 45D 46C 47A 48T 49D 50T

UPDATED: 30 March 2016
Word Count: 1221

Developing an Art Style of Your Own

vincent van gogh self portrait
Vincent Van Gogh – Self-Portrait 1886

One of the greatest compliments I ever received was from a renown artist who, after having viewed several of my paintings, pointed out that I had my own art style. I was surprised to hear that, because without realizing it, through the years, I had actually developed my own unique style of painting. Up until that day I hadn’t given much thought to even having my own style much less trying to develop one. What’s more, I barely even knew what an art style was. I knew all the Old Masters had it, or so I was told, and that it was something good to have. So I set out to find out more about artistic style, what it is and where it comes from.

What exactly is art style?

Artistic style is a specific characteristic or group of characteristics that is consistently present in the artworks of an artist. It’s that extra little thing, referred to as “identifiable style,” that an artist does to distinguish his/her work from the work of other artists.

Many artists, whether they realize it or not, have an identifiable style of painting. Their personal style is neither good or bad. It is simply the result of the particular choices and decisions a painter makes in the course of composing their oil paintings. These decisions are what defines the identity of an artist’s style and is made up of a combination of the mediums, technique and subject matter chosen. It’s not that an artist chooses to paint landscapes, still life or portraits — those are only genres. Rather, it is HOW the artist handles each of the various art elements (line, form, texture, value, color and shape) that make up the composition. Click for more information about the basic art elements.

Should you develop an art style of your own?

If you ever hope to be taken seriously as an artist, then I would definitely say “YES,” for the following reasons:

(1) Developing your own original style will help to define you and set you apart from other artists. It’s your individuality and uniqueness as an artist.

(2) It’s what allows others who view your work and know that it is a work painted by you without having to look at the signature on the canvas.

(3) It offers you a way to have personal satisfaction from your works by expressing your own ideas and inner vision.

(4) If you plan to display your paintings in art galleries, then a distinct art style is something a gallery owner or curator will want to see in your work.

(5) Finally, developing your own style is a necessary thing if you want your paintings to capture the eye of art collectors. Many collectors hold to a certain opinion of, “if it looks just like the real thing, then I’ll just take a photograph and hang it on the wall.” For many art connoisseurs, an artist’s personal style is the essence of the art.

How do you develop your personal painting style?

Before I can tell you how to do that, I first need to tell you how to absolutely NOT develop one. You won’t develop your own style by copying the works of other artists. Let me repeat that. If you copy the works of another artist, you will never develop a unique art style of your own. The reason for this is when you copy someone’s work, you are merely imitating the choices and decisions that have already been made by the artist who’s work you are copying. Novice painters often do this. They copy the works of other artists they like and this is a disservice to the world of art. As long as they continue to do this, they will never develop their own form of unique artistic expression and move beyond being a mere hobbyist to a serious artist or even a professional one. Your style is developed by the decisions and choices YOU make about the different elements that go into your painting.

An artist’s unique style does not develop over night. It evolves over time as a result of either conscious or unconscious effort on the part of the artist and it will most likely change a number of times as the painter grows as an artist. The best way to develop a style is to do a lot of painting. In doing so, you can expect your style to progress as you acquire more experience, knowledge and skills. As you move from painting to painting, you will find that certain artistic characteristics or qualities will keep reoccurring. This is your unique style. One thing to keep in mind about style is that you do not have to stick with the same one all your life. You can change it at any time and you will be surprised to find that it can and often does evolve.


What Is Art Appreciation?

Art appreciation is an understanding of the qualities that identify all great art. It involves having a knowledge of art movements, art history and art styles or techniques.


national park wall painting“Monument Valley”
Landscape by Teresa Bernard
16″ x 12″
Oils on stretched canvas

>> More info


  • Art Movements
    An art movement is defined by a specific style of art characterized by the same artistic idea, philosophy, goal, style or technique that is practiced or followed by a group of artists within a particular timeframe or region. Each art movement is subtly or distinctly different than another movement of art. However, clearly some movements have been influenced by other art movements as they show obvious similarities while others seem to defy them. It is interesting to study the differences between the art movements and also to study the different periods of art.

Click for a list of the various art movements.

  • Art History
    Art history is a historical study of the development of artworks in the fields of painting, sculpture, drawing, architecture and the other visual arts. The history of art spans a period of time from the earliest cave paintings to today. Art history presents two primary concerns (1) to determine who made a particular work of art and when, and (2) to understand the stylistic approach or school of thought used by artist in the creation of the work.
  • Art Styles/Techniques
    The style or technique of a particular artist or school or movement. It is that ‘thing’ which makes you recognize a particular painting as being by a particular artist before you’re close enough to see a signature or to read the image label. A painting style can be the way the paint is handled (such as Pollock) or the brush strokes (such as Van Gogh). It can be the way a subject is dealt with, or simply the choice of subject(s). It can be the range of colors used, or a particular color that’s used in every painting.

Click for more information about art painting styles.  See also information about the art genres.

Art Movements From A – Z

An art movement is a tendency or style in art with a specific common philosophy or goal, that is subtly or distinctly different than another movement of art, followed by a group of artists during a specific timeframe and region.


TX Hay bales Oil on canvas“Life in Texas — Round Hay Bales”
Landscape by Teresa Bernard
16″ x 20″
Oils on stretched canvas

>> More info


List of Art Movements
Name of movement – time period, where it began

« A »

  • Abstract Art –
  • Art Brut (a.k.a. Outsider art) – mid-1940s, United Kingdom/United States
  • Abstract Expressionism – 1940s, Post WWII, United States
  • Abstract Illusionism – mid – 1970s, United States
  • Academic Art –
  • Action Painting – 1940s – early 1960s, United States
  • Aestheticism –
  • Altermodern –
  • American Barbizon School – 1880s – 1890s, United States
  • American Impressionism – 1880s, United States
  • American Realism – mid 1800s – early 1900s, United States
  • American Scene Painting – c. 1920 – 1945, United States
  • Analytical Art –
  • Arabesque –
  • Art Deco – 1920s – 1930s, France
  • Art Informel – mid-1940s – 1950s
  • Art Nouveau – 1890 – 1914, France
  • Arte Povera – 1967 –
  • Arts and Crafts Movement – 1880 – 1910, United Kingdom
  • Ashcan School – 1907, United States
  • Assemblage –
  • Les Automatistes – early 1940s – , Canada

« B – C »

  • Barbizon School – c. 1830 – 1870, France
  • Baroque – 1600 – 1730, Rome
  • Bauhaus – 1919 – 1933, Germany
  • Classical Realism –
  • Color Field – 1940s – 1950s, United States
  • Concrete Art – 1940s – 1950s, Northern Italy/France
  • Conceptual Art – 1960s –
  • Constructivism – 1920s, Russia/Ukraine/Soviet Union
  • Cubism – 1907 – 1914, France

« D – E – F »

  • Dada – 1916 – 1930, Switzerland
  • Danube School – first third of the 16th century, Bavaria/Austria
  • Dau-al-Set – 1948 – , Barcelona
  • De Stijl (a.k.a. Neoplasticism) – 1917 – 1931, Holland
  • Digital Art – 1990 – present
  • Expressionism – 1905 – 1930, Germany
  • Fantastic Realism – 1946 – , Vienna
  • Fauvism – 1904 – 1909, France
  • Figurative Art –
  • Figuration Libre – early 1980s, France
  • Folk Art –
  • Futurism – 1910 – 1930, Italy

« G – H »

  • Gutai Group – 1954 – , Japan
  • Gothic Art – 12th century AD, Northern France
  • Harlem Renaissance – 1920 – 1930s, United States
  • Heidelberg School – late 1880s, Australia
  • Hudson River School – 1850s – c. 1880
  • Humanistic Aestheticism – 19th century, Europe
  • Hyperrealism – early 2000s – , United States/Europe

« I – J – K »

  • Impressionism – 1860 – 1890, France
  • International Gothic – late 14th and early 15th century, Burgundy/Bohemia/France/northern Italy
  • International Typographic Style – 1950s, Switzerland
  • Junk Art – 1960s –
  • Kinetic Art –

« L – M »

  • Land Art – late-1960s – early 1970s
  • Les Nabis – 1888 – 1900, France
  • Letterism – mid-1940s, Paris, France
  • Lowbrow (art movement) – late 1970s, Los Angeles, California
  • Lyrical Abstraction – mid-1960s,
  • Magic Realism – 1960s, Germany
  • Mannerism – 1520 – 1600, Central Italy
  • Massurrealism – 1992 –
  • Maximalism –
  • Metaphysical Painting – 1911 – 1920, Chirico
  • Mingei – 1920s – 1930s, Japan
  • Minimalism – 1960s – early 1970s, United States
  • Modernism – late 19th – early 20th centuries,
  • Modular Constructivism – 1950s – 1960s,

« N – O »

  • Naïve Art –
  • Neoclassicism – 1750 – 1830, Rome
  • Neo-Dada – 1950s, International
  • Neo-expressionism – late 1970s –
  • Neo-figurative – 1960s, Mexico/Spain
  • Neoism –  late 1970s, Canada
  • Neo-primitivism –
  • New Objectivity (Neue Sachlichkeit) – 1920s, Germany
  • Northwest School (art) – 1940s, United States
  • Objective Abstraction – c. 1933 – 1936, Great Britain
  • Op Art – 1964 –
  • Orphism – 1912, France

« P »

  • Photorealism – late 1960s – early 1970s
  • Plasticien – mid 1950s, Quebec, Canada
  • Plein Air –
  • Pointillism – 1879, France
  • Pop Art – mid-1950s, United Kingdom – United States
  • Post-impressionism – 1886 – 1905, France
  • Postminimalism – late-1960s – 1970s
  • Precisionism – c. 1920, United States
  • Pre-Raphaelitism – 1848 – 1854, England
  • Primitivism –
  • Process Art – mid-1960s – 1970s
  • Psychedelic Art – early 1960s –
  • Purism – 1918–1925, France

« Q – R »

  • Qajar Art – 1781 – 1925, Persia
  • Realism – 1830 – 1870, France
  • Regionalism (a.k.a. Scene Painting) – 1920s  – 1950s, United States
  • Remodernism – 1999 –
  • Renaissance – c. 1300 – c. 1602, Florence
  • Rococo – 1720 – 1780, France
  • Romanesque – 1000 AD – 13th-century AD, Europe
  • Romanticism – 1790 – 1880

« S – T »

  • Samikshavad –  1974  – , North India
  • Shin Hanga – early 20th-century, Japan
  • Sōsaku Hanga – early 20th-century, Japan
  • Socialist Realism – c. 1930 – 1950, Soviet Union/Germany
  • Sots Art (Soviet Pop Art) – early 1970s, Soviet Union
  • Space Art (also “astronomical art”) –
  • Street Art –
  • Stuckism – 1999 –
  • Suprematism – 1915 – 1925, Russia/Ukraine/Soviet Union
  • Surrealism – Since 1920s, France
  • Symbolism (arts) – 1880 – 1910, France/Belgium
  • Synchromism – 1912, United States
  • Tachisme (a.k.a. Informel) – late-1940s – mid-1950s, France
  • Toyism – 1992 – present
  • Transgressive Art – early 1980s – , New York City
  • Tonalism – 1880 – 1920, United States

« U – V – W – X – Y – Z »

  • Ukiyo-e – 17th – 19th century, Japan
  • Vancouver School – 1980s,  Vancouver, BC
  • Vanitas – 16th and 17th centuries, Flanders/Netherlands
  • Vorticism – 1914 – 1920, United Kingdom