Devils Tower — Our First National Monument

Devils Tower painting
© Copyright 2019 – Present

Size: 6″ w x 6″ h
Support: Gallery Wrap Stretched Canvas
Description: A small landscape painting of Devils Tower National Monument. The artwork does not need framing since the painted image extends around the edges of the canvas. Hand-painted and signed by fine artist Teresa Bernard.

See Artist Comments below for additional information regarding this painting.

painting with Devils Tower
Not to scale

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Artist Comments

I painted the Devils Tower in an oil painting after returning home from a trip with my husband to South Dakota in 2016.  During this trip, we visited Devils Tower National Monument. The monument is a unique geological rock tower that rises above the grassy plains of northeast Wyoming. At the time, we were vacationing in Rapid City, South Dakota. Since the tower was within driving distance of our hotel, we could not pass up the opportunity to visit this “one-of-a-kind natural wonder.”

We could see Devils Tower from miles away as we made our approach to the national monument. Upon arriving at our destination, we drove through the 2.1 square mile park which surrounded the monument. We couldn’t help but notice the tower as it was the centerpiece of the park. It looked like a giant granite tree stump with a flat summit and fluted sides.

Devils Tower stands more than 867 feet from its base to the summit. It measures approximately 180 feet by 300 feet at the top and is about a mile in circumference at the base. There is a 1.25-mile hiking trail around the tower base that provided us with spectacular close-up views from all sides. There was another much wider 3-mile trail that also loops around the tower, but we didn’t take that one. We spent a better part of the day exploring and learning everything about the tower before heading back to the hotel. All-in-all it was a wonderful experience that I would recommend to anyone.

Why “Devils Tower” and Not “Devil’s Tower”?

In 1906, President Teddy Roosevelt declared Devils Tower America’s first official national monument. The monument was initially named “Devil’s Tower” with an apostrophe; however, somewhere along the way, the apostrophe got dropped because of a clerical error and was never corrected. To this day, it is still called Devils Tower with no apostrophe.

Related post: The American Bison–Our National Animal

American Bison Our National Animal By Teresa Bernard
The American Bison 
(2020)
24″ w x 18″ h

Have a question?

If you have a question about this painting, please contact us, and we’ll be happy to answer any of your questions.

Other Paintings Of Interest

Lighthouse Monument, Palo Duro Canyon wall art
Lighthouse, Palo Duro Canyon (2016)
16″ w x 12″ h
Texas Flag Barn artwork
Texas Flag Barn
(2015)
20″ w x 16″ h
Life in Texas — Round Hay Bales painting
Life In Texas — Round Hay Bales (2013) 
16″ w x 20″ h

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UPDATED: 26 August 2021

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