Do You Know The Definition Of These Art Terms?

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test your knowledge of artDo you know the meaning of these common and not so common art terms? Take this simple 50 question test by writing your answers on paper. I know that seems like a lot, however, it’s only the tip of the ice burg when it comes to how much information is out there about art. Be sure to check your answers at the end of the quiz when you’re done. And don’t peek!

Choose the the best definition for each art term.

1. Achromatic

(A) Colors having zero saturation.
(B) Free from color; lacking hue.
(C) All of the above.

2. Aerial View

(A) Seeing from a point of view that is from an altitude.
(B) A comprehensive view in a downward direction, also called a “birds-eye view”.
(C) All of the above.

3. Analogous Colors

(A) Colors that sit across from each other on the color wheel.
(B) Any set of three or five colors that are closely related in hue(s). They are usually adjacent (next) to each other on the color wheel.
(C) All of the above.

4. Approximate Symmetry

(A) The use of forms which are similar on either side of a central axis. They may give a feeling of the exactness or equal relationship but are sufficiently varied to prevent visual monotony.
(B) Identical shapes are repeated on either side of a central axis. The left side becomes a mirror image of the right side.
(C) All of the above.

5. Asymmetrical Balance

(A) When both sides of a balancing point are equal; that is, they are identical or almost identical.
(B) Placement of non-identical forms to either side of a balancing point in such a way that the two sides seem to be of the same weight visually.
(C) All of the above.

6. Atmospheric Perspective

(A) A comprehensive view in a downward direction.
(B) A technique used by painters for representing three-dimensional space on a flat two-dimensional surface by creating the illusion of depth, or recession.
(C) All of the above.

7. Balance

(A) A feeling of equality in weight, attention, or attraction of the various elements within a composition as a means of accomplishing unity.
(B) A feeling created when various elements within an artwork are distributed to create a sense of uneasiness.
(C) All the above.

8. Chromatic

(A) Pertaining to color. Being or having or characterized by hue. (B) A color perceived to have a hue saturation greater than zero.
(C) All of the above.

9. Color Permanence

(A) Refers to a pigment’s resistance to fading when exposed to light.
(B) Colors which loose their hue saturation when strongly diluted or combined with white.
(C) All of the above.

10. Composition

(A) The arrangement of the design elements within the design area.
(B) The ordering of visual and emotional experience to give unity and consistency to a work of art and to allow the observer to comprehend its meaning.
(C) All of the above.

11. Dominance

(A) A technique used by artists by introducing toned down compositional elements to a composition.
(B) The emphasis that is placed on a particular area or characteristic of an artwork.
(C) All of the above.

12. Focal Point

(A) A specific area, element or principle that dominates a work of art. The viewer’s eye is usually drawn there first.
(B) The area in a work where the eye is most compellingly drawn. Also referred to as center of interest.
(C) All of the above.

13. Foreshortening

(A) A form of perspective used to create the illusion of an object receding strongly into the distance or background.
(B) Characterized chiefly by short brush strokes of bright colors in immediate juxtaposition to represent the effect of light on objects.
(C) All of the above.

14. Fugitive Colors

(A) Colors that keep the same hue though they may lose saturation down to a dead gray.
(B) Short-lived colors capable of fading or changing, especially with exposure to light, to atmospheric pollution, or when mixed with certain substances.
(C) All of the above.

15. Grisaille

(A) An art technique that uses realistic imagery to create the optical illusion that the depicted objects exist in three dimensions.
(B) A monochrome painting technique executed entirely in shades of grey or of another neutral greyish color.
(C) All of the above.

16. Highlight

(A) The brightest part of an artwork.
(B) The most saturated of a paint color from a hue family.
(C) All of the above.

17. Horizon Line

(A) A line that divides a scene into three rows and three columns.
(B) In a painting, a level line where land or water ends and the sky begins.
(C) All of the above.

18. Horizontal Balance

(A) The components that are balanced above and below a central axis.
(B) The components that are balanced left and right of a central axis.
(C) All of the above.

19. Hue

(A) The name of the color, such as red, green or yellow.
(B) The color that can be seen when white light passes through a prism.
(C) All of the above.

20. Implied Line

(A) A line in an artwork that is subtlety perceived by the viewer but has no physical form.
(B) The overall flow of one line into another in a artwork, with continuation from one area to the next suggested by their common direction and/or juxtaposition.
(C) All of the above.

21. Landscape

(A) Works of art characterized by a childlike simplicity that possesses minute detail, bright saturated colors and lack of perspective.
(B) Works of art which depicts outdoor scenery that typically include trees, buildings, crops, mountains, rivers, wildlife and forests.
(C) All of the above.

22. Linear Perspective

(A) A system for creating the illusion of depth on a two-dimensional surface by determining the relative size of objects from the foreground of an image to the background.
(B) A system based on a scientifically or mathematically derived series of actual or implied lines that intersect at a vanishing point on the horizon.
(C) All of the above.

23. Local Color

(A) An object’s true color.
(B) The actual color as distinguished from the apparent color of objects and surfaces; true color, without shadows or reflections.
(C) All of the above.

24. Masterpiece

(A) A work done with extraordinary skill, especially a work of art, craft or intellect that is an exceptionally great achievement.
(B) A manner of painting in which the forms, colors, or tones of an object are lightly and rapidly indicated.
(C) All of the above.

25. Medium

(A) The material or technique an artist works in, oil paint or watercolor are examples.
(B) The component of paint in which the pigment is dispersed.
(C) All of the above.

26. Minimal Design

(A) Omitting all non-essential or un-important elements and details which don’t really contribute to the essence of the overall composition.
(B) The stress placed on a single area of a work or a unifying visual theme.
(C) All of the above.

27. Monochromatic

(A) Colors whose relative visual temperatures make them seem cool.
(B) A color scheme limited to variations of one hue and all its tints and/or shades.
(C) All of the above.

28. Negative Space

(A) The term for a genre of modern artistic expression that strives to show the wonders of the Universe.
(B) The unoccupied or empty space left after the positive shapes have been laid down by the artist.
(C) All of the above.

29. Old Master

(A) A term that traditionally refers to a prominent and highly skilled European artist during the 16th, 17th, or early 18th century.
(B) A work of art by an established master.
(C) All of the above.

30. Perspective

(A) A technique used to create the illusion of distance or depth on a flat surface.
(B) The position from which something is seen or considered.
(C) All of the above.

31. Pigment

(A) Any coloring agent, made from natural or synthetic substances, used in paints or drawing materials.
(B) The substance in paint or anything that absorbs light, producing (reflecting) the same color as the pigment.
(C) All of the above.

32. Positive Space

(A) Space that is occupied by an element or a form.
(B) The mass of three-dimensional shapes in space.
(C) All of the above.

33. Pure Symmetry

(A) Reducing the importance of one or more elements in a work of art to increase the importance of other elements.
(B) An equilibrium created by identical parts that are equally distributed on either side of a real or imaginary central axis in mirror-like repetition.
(C) All of the above.

34. Radial Balance

(A) The distribution of mass within an automobile tire or the entire wheel to which it is attached.
(B) The balance as the result of components that are distributed around a center point or spring out from a central line.
(C) All of the above.

35. Seascape

(A) A painting or work of art that depicts the sea, life around the sea, or a scene that includes the sea.
(B) A a painting representing an expansive view of the ocean or sea.
(C) All of the above.

36. Simplicity

(A) Omitting the unnecessary details that don’t make a major impact on the design or composition.
(B) A technique in painting characterized by openness of form.
(C) All of the above.

37. Still Life

(A) A painting or other two-dimensional work of art representing inanimate objects such as bottles, fruit, and flowers.
(B) The arrangement of these objects from which a drawing, painting, or other art work is made.
(C) All of the above.

38. Subject Matter

(A) The topic dealt with or the subject represented in a work of art.
(B) The size, bulk and dimension of a particular object.
(C) All of the above.

39. Support

(A) The material providing a surface upon which an artist applies color, collage, etc.
(B) Something made to enclose a picture or mirror.
(C) All of the above.

40. Symmetrical Balance

(A) A mathematically generated pattern that is reproducible at any magnification or reduction.
(B) The placing of identical forms to either side of the central axis of a work to stabilize it visually.
(C) All of the above.

41. T-square

(A) A rigid framework, often wood or steel, used to support a sculpture or other large work while it is being made.
(B) A guide for drawing horizontal lines.
(C) All of the above.

42. Three-dimensional

(A) Occupying or giving the illusion of three dimensions (height, width, and depth).
(B) A measurable distance on a surface which show height and width.
(C) All of the above.

43. Tint

(A) A hue with white added. Pink is a tint of red.
(B) Colors of very low saturation, approaching grays.
(C) All of the above.

44. Two-dimensional

(A) Having two dimensions (height and width).
(B) Referring to something that is flat.
(C) All of the above.

45. Underpainting

(A) A painting technique in which pure dots of color are dabbed onto the canvas surface.
(B) The preliminary layers of paint in a painting that render the basic outline of the image before the final paint layers are added to complete the work.
(C) All of the above.

46. Undertone

(A) A subdued or muted tone of color.
(B) A white material for preparing canvas for painting, made of a mixture of chalk, white pigment, and glue.
(C) All of the above.

47. Vanishing Point

(A) In perspective, the point on the horizon in the distance where two parallel lines appear to converge and visibility ends.
(B) A continuance, a flow, or a feeling of movement achieved by the repetition or regulated visual units.
(C) All of the above.

48. Vertical Balance

(A) The interval or measurable distance between pre-established points.
(B) The distribution of visual weights in an artwork that top and bottom seem to be in equilibrium.
(C) All of the above.

49. Wildlife Art

(A) The exploration of nature in art.
(B) Works of art which portray wildlife or domesticated animals.
(C) All of the above.

50. Worm’s-eye View

(A) As if seen from the surface of the earth, or the floor looking up from below.
(B) A variation on a landscape painting where the horizon is placed very low in the picture, or outside of it completely.
(C) All of the above.

More Quizzes to Test Your Knowledge of Art

Can You Name These Famous Paintings From History?

Do You Know The Definition Of These Art Terms?You are here.

Test Your Knowledge of Art Appreciation

Test Your Knowledge of COLOR Theory

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Elements and Principles of Design

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Painting

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Art Glossary Links

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Answers: 1C, 2C, 3B, 4A, 5B, 6B, 7A, 8C, 9A, 10C, 11B, 12C, 13A, 14B, 15B, 16A, 17B, 18B, 19A, 20C, 21B, 22C, 23C, 24A, 25C, 26A, 27B, 28B, 29C, 30A, 31C, 32A, 33B, 34B, 35C, 36A, 37C, 38A, 39A, 40B, 41B, 42A, 43A,44C, 45B, 46A, 47A, 48B, 49B, 50C

UPDATED: 22 March 2021


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ACEO and ATC Collectables

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What are ACEOs and ATCs?

Art Cards, Editions and Originals (ACEO) and Artist Trading Cards (ATC) are highly collectable works of art in the form of trading cards much like baseball cards. Also known simply as Art Cards. ATCs or art cards are traded, handed out or swapped, while others are sold. When they are sold, they are referred to as ACEOs.

These cards are actual works of art which are tiny in size and handmade by artists. Like sports cards they measure 2.5 in x 3.5 in. However, they are not mass printed like sports cards.

ACEOs / ATCs can be kept as part of a collection of art cards or proudly displayed by framing them and setting on a shelf or hung on the wall.

Advantages of ACEOs and ATCs

    • They are easy to collect, trade and display.
    • Art aficionados can acquire a large collection of art work at a small cost.
    • Their small size means your art collection isn’t limited by the amount of wall space you have available in your home or workspace.
    • They make great gifts!

For additional information about the history of ACEOs / ATCs and how this art movement got started, click here.

Art cards are perfect for gifts, collecting, trading or sale.

These cards are limited edition artist trading cards and each one is individually handmade by the artist.  Each tiny painting is an original, one-of-a-kind, handmade work of art suitable for framing and display or collecting as part of an art card collection.

ACEO-ATC-DemoRoseRock

ATCOs & ATCs are great for framing.
ATCOs and ATCs are great for framing!

Have a question?

If you have a question about this painting, please contact us and we’ll be happy to answer any of your questions.

Teresa’s Insider News

Be the first to know! Sign up here to be among the first to receive sneak peeks of recently completed paintings, new announcements and other updates at the art studio.

Teresa has an insider newsletter and it’s FREE! This is her way of keeping her friends up to date by giving you sneak peeks of new paintings she completes, as well as other announcements before they are made public. Her newsletter is published every other month, so be sure to get on her mailing list. You don’t want to miss a thing!

Thanks for looking!

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UPDATED: 31 March 2021


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Can You Name These Famous Paintings From History?

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Name That Painting

Test your knowledge of art history by naming these famous paintings. Take this simple 25 question test by writing your answers on paper, then check your answers at the end of the quiz. Don’t peek!

What is the name of each famous paintings pictured below?

Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci1.  __________ (1503 – 1506) by Leonardo da Vinci

A. Portrait of Lisa Gherardini
B. Mona Lisa
C. Ma Donna
D. My Lady

The Creation of Adam by Michelangelo

2.  __________ (1511–1512) by Michelangelo

A. The Creation of Adam
B. God Reaches Out
C. Genesis of Man
D. The Touch of God

Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer

3.  __________ (1665) by Johannes Vermeer

A. Girl with a Blue Headscarf
B. Girl with an Exotic Dress
C. Girl with a Pearl Earring
D. Girl with an Oriental Turban

The Scream by Edvard Munch

4.  __________ (1893) by Edvard Munch

A. The Ghost
B. The Tormented
C. The Traveler
D. The Scream

The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dali

5.  __________ (1931) by Salvador Dali

A. Time Keeps Slipping
B. The Persistence of Memory
C. The Soft Watches
D. The Melting Watches

Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

6.  __________ (1876) by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

A. Dance at the Moulin De La Galette
B. Dance in the Country
C. Dance at Bougival
D. Luncheon of the Boating Party

Sunflowers by Vincent van Gogh

7.  __________ (1888) by Vincent van Gogh

A. Roses and Sunflowers
B. Paris Sunflowers
C. Nothing But Sunflowers
D. Sunflowers

Grainstacks at Giverny by Claude Monet

8.  __________ (1888-1889) by Claude Monet

A. Grainstacks at Giverny, sunset
B. Haystacks as Sunset
C. The Harvest
D. Haystacks in a Field

Dance Class by Edgar Degas

9.  __________ (1871) by Edgar Degas

A. Dance Recital
B. Ballet Rehearsal
C. Dance Class
D. Fin d’Arabesque, with ballerina

The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci

10.  __________ (1495-1498) by Leonardo da Vinci

A. Jesus and the Twelve Disciples
B. The Last Passover
C. The Final Communion
D. The Last Supper

Poppy Field by Claude Monet

11.  __________ (1873) by Claude Monet

A. Summer Days
B. Poppy Field
C. Country Stroll
D. A Walk in the Park

Jimson Weed by Georgia O'Keeffe

12.  __________ (1936) by American artist Georgia O’Keeffe

A. Jimson Weed/White Flower No. 1
B. Portrait of a White Flower
C. No. 13 – Special
D. White Blossom – Special

Portrait of Claude Monet by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

13.  __________ (1875) by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

A. Self Portrait
B. Portrait of Vincent van Gogh
C. Portrait of Claude Monet
D. Portrait of Paul Cézanne

Self Portrait by Vincent van Gogh

14.  __________ (1889) by Vincent van Gogh

A. Self Portrait
B. Portrait of Claude Monet
C. Portrait of Pierre-Auguste Renoir
D. Portrait of Paul Cézanne

The Church at Varengeville by Claude Monet

15.  __________ (1882) by Claude Monet

A. City on a Hill
B. Impression Sunrise
C. Cliffs of Dover
D. The Church at Varengeville, Against the Sunset

Vase of Sunflowers by Henri Matisse

16.  __________ (1898) by Henri Matisse

A. Vase of Sunflowers
B. Vase with Flowers
C. Still Life with Yellow Flowers
D. Yellow Blossoms

Eilif Peterssen Laksefiskeren (1889)

17.  __________ (1889) by Eilif Peterssen

A. The Fisherman
B. Summer Evening
C. Laksefiskeren, The Salmon Fisher
D. Canal Grande

Ballet Rehearsal on Stage by Edgar Degas

18.  __________ (1874) by Edgar Degas

A. The Rehearsal
B. Ballet Dancers on Stage
C. The Dance Class (La Classe de Danse)
D. Ballet Rehearsal on Stage

Henri Rousseau's The Repast of the Lion

19.  __________ (c. 1907) by Henri Rousseau

A. The Hungry Lion
B. The Repast of the Lion
C. The Jungle
D. King of the Jungle

J.M.W. Turner's The Jetty of Calais

20.  __________ (1803) by J.M.W. Turner

A. The Jetty of Calais
B. Battle of the Kearsarge and the Alabama
C. Ships at Le Havre
D. The Storm on the Sea of Galilee

The Death of General Wolfe by Benjamin West

21.  __________ (1770) by Benjamin West

A. Battle of the Plains of Abraham
B. The Seven Years’ War
C. Battle of Quebec
D. The Death of General Wolfe

Country Wedding by John Lewis Krimmel

22.  __________ (1820) by John Lewis Krimmel

A. Merry Company
B. Country Wedding
C. The Marriage of Krimmel’s Daughter
D. The White Dress

Children on a Farm by Camille Pissarro

23.  __________ (1887) by Camille Pissarro

A. Children at Play
B. Two Young Peasant Girls
C. Children on a Farm
D. Kids in a Courtyard

Fugue in Two Colors by František Kupka

24.  __________ (1912) by František Kupka

A. Amorpha, Fugue en deux couleurs (Fugue in Two Colors)
B. Untitled (First Abstract Watercolor)
C. Dances at the Spring
D. The Procession

Windows Open Simultaneously by Robert Delaunay

25.  __________ (1912) by Robert Delaunay

A. Formes Circulaires
B. Soleil n°2
C. Colored Rhythm
D. Windows Open Simultaneously

More Quizzes to Test Your Knowledge of the Fine Arts

Can You Name These Famous Paintings From History?You are here.

Do You Know The Definition Of These Art Terms?   

Test Your Knowledge of Art Appreciation

Test Your Knowledge of COLOR Theory

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Elements and Principles of Design

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Painting

Have a question?

If you have a question about this painting, please contact us and we’ll be happy to answer any of your questions.

Teresa’s Insider News

Be the first to know! Sign up here to be among the first to receive sneak peeks of recently completed paintings, new announcements and other updates at the art studio.

Teresa has an insider newsletter and it’s FREE! This is her way of keeping her friends up to date by giving you sneak peeks of new paintings she completes, as well as other announcements before they are made public. Her newsletter is published every other month, so be sure to get on her mailing list. You don’t want to miss a thing!

Thanks for taking this quiz!

Feel free to share this with your friends.


Answers: 1B, 2A, 3C, 4D, 5B, 6A, 7D, 8A, 9C, 10D, 11B, 12A, 13C, 14A, 15D, 16A, 17C, 18D, 19B, 20A, 21D, 22B, 23C, 24A, 25D

UPDATED: 29 March 2021


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Basic Art Element — Color, Part 2

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color theoryIn the previous lesson, titled “Basic Art Element — Color, Part 1” we looked at the basics of color and its relationship on the color wheel. In this lesson, color harmony (a.k.a color schemes), will be discussed.

Color Harmony

Color harmony is the relationship of colors that work well together. A harmony can be basic having only one color with several shades (monochromatic) or two colors that complement one another, or it can be a more advanced relationship involving a combination of multiple colors. There are many ideas for achieving harmony in our color palettes. These harmonies are based on the color wheel. A color wheel is a handy tool to have around as it helps the artist understand which colors work well together. Following are some illustrations and descriptions introducing some of the more popular color harmonies.

Color Relationships

Monochromatic

The word “monochromatic” means one color and a monochromatic color scheme is made from the various tones, shades and tints that are surprisingly possible within a single color. Monochromatic colors work well together, producing a harmonizing and soothing effect.

A monochromatic color scheme is created by choosing a single color from any of the twelve colors found on the color wheel, then using it along with its various tints, shades and tones. The example below is a monochromatic family.

monochromatic color scheme

Complementary

ColorWheel-OppositesComplementary colors (a.k.a. color opposites) are those that are located directly opposite each other on the color wheel. For example: violet is the complementary of yellow since it is located opposite of yellow on the color wheel.

The complementary or color opposites are:

    • Red and green
    • Yellow and violet
    • Blue and orange
    • Yellow-green and red-purple
    • Yellow-orange and blue-violet
    • Red-orange and blue-green
    • Red-violet and yellow-green
    • Red-orange and blue-green
    • Blue-violet and yellow-orange

Painting tips regarding color opposites:

1) When equal amounts of color opposites are mixed together they will cancel each other out resulting in a drab neutral gray.

color opposites vibrate2) When color opposites are placed next to each other, especially when fully saturated, they create the strongest contrast between them and will even create the optical illusion of appearing to vibrate. This illusion is most evident between red and green.

Split-Complementary

split-complementary color schemeA variation on the complementary color scheme is the split-complementary color scheme. Rather than the color opposite the key color on the wheel, the split complementary takes the two colors directly on either side of the complementary color. For example if your key color is yellow, you would select the two colors on either side of violet instead of violet to make up this harmony of colors.

This scheme allows for a nicer range of colors while still not deviating from the basic harmony between the key color and its complementary color. It has the same visual appeal as the complementary color scheme, however, with less contrast and tension.  The split complimentary color scheme is a safe choice for virtually any design as it is near impossible to mess up and always looks good.

Analogous

colorwheel-AnalogousAnalogous colors are groups of three colors that sit next to one another on the color wheel. One being the main or dominant color and two supporting colors. The effect of this color scheme can be quite dramatic as these hues usually work very well together in creating a sense of unity or harmony within the composition.

When using this color scheme, choose one as the dominate color (usually a primary or secondary color), a second color to support, and a third as an accent.

Accented Analogous

accented analogous colorsAn accented analogous scheme (also called analogous complementary) is a combination of the analogous and complementary color schemes. It consists of colors which sit next to each other on the color wheel and a color that is directly opposite to these. The direct complement then becomes the accent color to create a dynamic contrast against the dominant color grouping. This is a great way to add warmth to a cool analogous color pallet or a cool accent color to an otherwise warm color scheme.

Painting tips using this color scheme:

1) This color scheme works best when the number of colors used are limited to four.

2) A good time to use this scheme is when three closely relate colors are dominating a design. Adding the contrasting color provides a surprising accent for the composition.

Triadic (Triad)

triadic color schemeA triadic color scheme is made up of three colors which are equally spaced from one another on the color wheel forming an equilateral triangle. Thus every fourth color on the color wheel will make up part of a triad.

Some examples of triadic color schemes could be:

    • Red / Yellow / Blue
    • Orange / Green / Violet
    • Yellow-Orange / Blue-Green / Red-Violet
    • Yellow-Green / Blue-Violet / Red-Orange

Painting tips for mixing triad colors:

1) Work with only the three selected colors in your triad and their mixes.
2) Make one of your colors dominant with the other two acting as subordinates.
3) Add variety to your design by including different shades, tints and tones of your triad colors.

Test your knowledge of Color. Take this simple test.

Your Next Art Lesson

If you enjoyed this lesson, be sure to check out another one in this series.

The Basic Elements of Art (Introduction)

Basic Art Element — Color, Part 1

Basic Art Element — Color, Part 2

Basic Art Element — Line

Basic Art Element — Space

Basic Art Element — Texture

Basic Art Element — Value

More Art Lessons

Good Design Principle: An Introduction

Good Design Principle: Balance

Good Design Principle: Contrast

Good Design Principle: Emphasis

Good Design Principle: Movement

Good Design Principle: Proportion

Good Design Principle: Space

Good Design Principle: Visual Economy

Good Design Principle: Unity

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UPDATED: 26 October 2020


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Test Your Knowledge of Art Appreciation

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test your knowledge of artHow much do you know about art appreciation? Take this simple 50 question quiz by writing your answers on paper, then check your answers at the end of the quiz. Don’t peek!

1. __________ is the expression of human creative skill and imagination.

A.    Emphasis
B.    Contour
C.    Art
D.    Dominance

2. In what way is art important in daily life?

A.    It has personal significance.
B.    It reflects our society.
C.    It records history.
D.    It is used for marketing and advertising.
E.    It is a form of self-expression.
F.    All of the above.

3. The way to do an art critique is to __________.

A.    describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate the piece
B.    talk to the artist
C.    decide if it’s good
D.    write an artist statement

4. A person learning a trade or an art from a skilled worker is called __________.

A.    an apprentice
B.    a mentor
C.    a foreman
D.    a laborer

5. A rule used by artists when planning a good composition.

A.    “Rule of Sketch”
B.    “Rule of Placement”
C.    “Rule of Perspective”
D.    “Rule of Thirds”

6. Andy Warhol, an American painter and filmmaker, is best known for his depiction of what grocery store item?

A.    Apples
B.    Bacon
C.    Tomato Soup
D.    Onions

7. Andy Warhol’s work can best be classified as __________.

A.    realism
B.    pop art
C.    splatterpaint
D,    cubism

8. A style of artwork created using many geometric shapes, often not resembling any object.

A.    Surrealism
B.    Favauvism
C.    Cubism
D.    Baroque

9. An art style where the artist tries to paint a picture exactly how it looks in real life, with as many details as possible.

A.    Impressionism
B.    Pointillism
C.    Realism
D.    Favauvism

10. A style of art where the artist attempts to convey as much of their emotion into the artwork as possible, often using distortion and emphasis.

A.    Expressionism
B.    Surrealism
C.    Cubism
D.    Impressionist

11. The way artwork is arranged is called __________.

A.    emphasis
B.    contour
C.    composition
D.    stylus

12. Surrealism is an art movement which used dream-like images.

True | False

13. An art style where artwork is extremely detailed and ornate.

A.    Surrealism
B.    Baroque
C.    Favauvism
D.    Expressionism

14. Pablo Picasso is from the country of __________.

A.    Germany
B.    Italy
C.    Spain
D.    United States of America

15. What is the title of the style of painting that Picasso invented?

A.    Realism
B.    Impressionism
C.    Cubism
D.    Art Nouveau

16. Where is the “Mona Lisa” hanging in France?

A.    Gargoyle square
B.    The Louvre
C.    The Eiffel Tower
D.    Chartres Cathedral

17. Van Gogh’s most famous work of art to this day __________.

A.    “The Mona Lisa”
B.    “The Scream”
C.    “Starry Night”
D.    “Poppies”

18. What country was Van Gogh born in?

A.    Holland
B.    France
C.    Spain
D.    United States of America

19. Georgia O’Keeffe was an __________ artist.

A.    English
B.    Italian
C.    American
D.    Australian

20. O’Keeffe is best known for her paintings of  __________.

A.    the sea and marine animals
B.    enlarged flowers and New Mexico landscapes
C.    native American Indians
D.    the Australian Outback

21. Salvador Dali is considered a Surrealist artist.

True | False

22. Salvador Dali was born in India.

True | False

23. Rembrandt is known as an artist of what style?

A.    Impressionists
B.    Baroque
C.    Modern
D.    Prehistoric

24. Rembrandt, considered one of the greatest painters and printmakers in European art, was born in what country?

A.    Netherlands
B.    Switzerland
C.    France
D.    Spain

25. Monet is the father of which movement?

A.    Realism
B.    Impressionism
C.    Cubism
D.    Art Nouveau

26. Where did Monet grow up?

A.    Holland
B.    England
C.    France
D.    United States of America

27. Georges Seurat, the artist who created the painting “Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte”, used which method of art?

A.    Cubism
B.    Pointillism
C.    Abstract
D.    Dadaism

28. “Mona Lisa” was painted by __________.Mona LIsa

A.    Vincent van Gogh
B.    Claude Monet
C.    Picasso
D.    Leonardo da Vinci

29. “Sunflowers” was painted by __________.Sunflowers

A.    Pierre-August Renoir
B.    Vincent van Gogh
C.    Johannes Vermeer
D.    Michelangelo

30. “Poppies in a Field” was painted by __________.Poppies In A Field

A.    Claude Monet
B.    Leonardo da Vinci
C.    Rene Magritte
D.    Johannes Vermeer

31. “The Scream” was painted by __________.The Scream

A.    Vincent van Gogh
B.    Pierre-August Renoir
C.    Edvard Munch
D.    Claude Monet

32. “The Last Supper” was painted by __________.The Last Supper

A.    Leonardo da Vinci
B.    Pierre-August Renoir
C.    Edvard Munch
D.    Michelangelo

33. “Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette” was painted by __________.Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette

A.    Rene Magritte
B.    Picasso
C.    Pierre-August Renoir
D.    Johannes Vermeer

34. “Girl with a Pearl Earring” was painted by __________.Girl with a Pearl Earring

A.    Picasso
B.    Johannes Vermeer
C.    Michelangelo
D.    Edvard Munch

35. “Dance Class” was painted by __________.Dance Class

A.    Claude Monet
B.    Leonardo da Vinci
C.    Edgar Degas
D.    Rene Magritte

36. “Creation of Adam” was painted by __________.Creation of Adam

A.    Michelangelo
B.    Johannes Vermeer
C.    Pierre-August Renoir
D.    Leonardo da Vinci

37. “The Persistence of Memory” was painted by __________.The Persistence of Memory

A.    Johannes Vermeer
B.    Pierre-August Renoir
C.    Salvador Dali
D.    Leonardo da Vinci

38. What does a color wheel show?

A.    Complementary colors
B.    Analogous colors
C.    Primary colors
D.    All of the above

39. Movement in art where hundreds of dots are used to create a picture or painting.

A.    Pointilism
B.    Impressionism
C.    Realism
D.    Abstract

40. The artist Edgar Degas was best known for his paintings of waterlilies.

True | False

41. Edward Degas was a nineteenth-century French artist famous for his paintings, sculptures, prints, and drawings.

True | False

42. Impressionism is a 19th century art movement that mainly focused on the __________.

A.    study of geometric form
B.    study of negative and positive space
C.    study of light on the surface of an object
D.    study of value

43. Art that emerged in the mid-1950s that used imagery from popular culture is termed __________.

A.    Impressionism
B.    Realism
C.    Minimalism
D.    Pop Art

44. A twentieth century non-representational painting style in which artists applied paints freely to express feelings and emotions.

A.    Abstract Expressionism
B.    Fauvism
C.    Pop Art
D.    Cubism

45. Jackson Pollock’s paintings were classified as what?

A.    Realism
B.    Grotesque
C.    Surreal
D.    Splatterpaint

46. Jackson Pollock was an influential American painter and a major figure in what movement?

A.    American Modernism
B.    Pop Art
C.    Abstract Expressionist
D.    Minimalism

47. An English landscape painter of the late eighteenth century, known for his pastoral scenes.

A.    John Constable
B.    Willem de Kooning
C.    Pablo Picasso
D.    Vincent van Gogh

48. Cityscapes, or as it is sometimes called Urban Landscapes, are paintings whose subject matter is the physical aspects of the city and urban life.

True | False

49. A collection of meaningless shapes, texture and colors thrown haphazardly onto a canvas. Its purpose is to let the viewer interpret its meaning for him/herself.

A.    Still Life
B.    Grotesque
C.    Collage
D.    Abstract

50. Naïve Art is works of art characterized by a childlike simplicity that possesses minute detail, bright saturated colors, disproportionate figures and lack of perspective.

True | False

Additional Reading

Know Your Art Painting Styles: 7 Most Popular

What Is Art Appreciation?

Classification Of Fine Art Paintings By Genre

More Quizzes to Test Your Knowledge of the Fine Arts

Can You Name These Famous Paintings From History?

Do You Know The Definition Of These Art Terms?

Test Your Knowledge of Art AppreciationYour are here.

Test Your Knowledge of COLOR Theory

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Elements and Principles of Design

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Painting

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Have a question?

If you have a question about this painting, please contact us and we’ll be happy to answer any of your questions.

Teresa’s Insider News

Be the first to know! Sign up here to be among the first to receive sneak peeks of recently completed paintings, new announcements and other updates at the art studio.

Teresa has an insider newsletter and it’s FREE! This is her way of keeping her friends up to date by giving you sneak peeks of new paintings she completes, as well as other announcements before they are made public. Her newsletter is published every other month, so be sure to get on her mailing list. You don’t want to miss a thing!

Thanks for taking this quiz!

Feel free to share this with your friends.


Answers: 1C, 2F, 3A, 4A, 5D, 6C, 7B, 8C, 9C, 10A, 11C, 12T, 13B, 14C, 15C, 16B, 17C, 18A, 19C, 20B, 21T, 22F, 23B, 24A, 25B, 26C, 27B, 28D, 29B, 30A, 31C, 32A, 33C, 34B, 35C, 36A, 37C, 38D, 39A, 40F, 41T, 42C, 43D, 44A, 45D, 46C, 47A, 48T, 49D, 50T

UPDATED: 29 March 2021


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Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Painting

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art brush careTest your knowledge of fine art painting. Take this simple quiz by writing your answers on paper, then check your answers at the end of the quiz. Don’t peek!

1. The primary colors are __________.

A.    Red-orange, red-purple, yellow-orange, yellow-green, blue-green, and blue-purple
B.    Green, orange, and purple
C.    White, black, gray, and brown
D.    Red, blue, and yellow

2. Which of the following are examples of cool colors?

A.    Orange, green and purple (or violet)
B.    Blue, green and violet (or purple)
C.    Yellow, blue and red
D.    White, black and brown

3. Which of the following are examples of warm colors?

A.    Yellow, red, and orange
B.    Yellow, red and blue
C.    Yellow, green and blue
D.    Orange, purple and green

4. What color is the result of mixing red + yellow?

A.    Violet (Purple)
B.    Orange
C.    Brown
D.    Green

5. What color is the result of mixing red + blue?

A.    Violet (Purple)
B.    Orange
C.    Brown
D.    Green

6. What color is the result of mixing yellow + blue?

A.    Violet (Purple)
B.    Orange
C.    Brown
D.    Green

7. What color is the result of mixing red + yellow + blue?

A.    Violet (Purple)
B.    Orange
C.    Brown
D.    Green

8. A self-portrait is when an artist creates a painting of someone else.

True | False

9. A landscape is depiction of natural outdoor scenery such as mountains, valleys, trees, rivers, forests, etc. as the main subject.

True | False

10. A still life painting is a work of art that depicts an arrangement of inanimate objects (such as food, household items, flowers, plants, rocks, and sea shells, for example).

True | False

11. A seascape is a work of art that portrays the sea and marine or sea life. It can also include views of the sea and geographical locations with good views of the sea.

True | False

12. A painting done of wild or domestic animals can be classified as a wildlife painting.

True | False

13. The placement of line, shape, color and value in a work of art; basically the total design.

A.    Value
B.    Composition
C.    Emphasis
D.    Sketch

14. Creating dominance or importance in an artwork is called __________.

A.    Emphasis
B.    Value
C.    Art
D.    Composition

15. The the first step in painting a still life is __________.

A.    drawing contours
B.    shading your objects
C.    choosing a composition
D.    adding visual texture

16. Which technique can be used to show the illusion of depth?

A.   Linear perspective
B.   Shading/Value
C.   Overlapping
D.   All the above

17. When creating depth, objects that are farther away should be __________ in size than objects that are closer.

A.   fatter
B.   smaller
C.   larger
D.   taller

18. Objects that appear in the center of an art work are called __________.

A.    foreground
B.    middle-ground
C.    background
D.    horizon

19. The center of interest in a work of art is the area that attracts the viewer’s eye. It is also called __________.

A.    focal point
B.    texture
C.    form
D.    balance

20. A tool used by an artist to obtain proper proportion and placement of a drawing is called a __________.

A.    calculator
B.    grid
C.    line
D.    protractor

21. The background is the portion of the art that is in front of the objects.

True | False

22. The horizon line is an real line where the land meets the sky.

True | False

23. How can an artist show unity in their artwork?

A.    By drawing happy people
B.    By using principles of design that work together to create harmony
C.    By using many different elements and principles in their artwork
D.    By drawing everything really close together

24. Negative space is the background or space around the subject of the artwork.

True | False

25. As a rule in painting, objects in the background are usually made lighter to show __________.

A.    distance
B.    detail
C.    emphasis
D.    movement

26. Perspective is used in art to create __________.

A.    a vivid painting
B.    the illusion of depth
C.    create pattern
D.    create balance

27. The aesthetic center of interest is located directly in the middle of the format.

True | False

28. The point on the horizon line where parallel lines appear to disappear.

A.    Tonal Range
B.    Proportion
C.    Vanishing Point
D.    Linear Perspective

29. Two lines that eventually come together are converging.

True | False

30. What essential tool is necessary to create linear perspective?

A.    Compass
B.    Projector
C.    Ruler or straight edge
D.    Calculator

31. An object in the foreground should be drawn small and toward the top of the paper.

True | False

32. Objects in the middle ground of an artwork should be drawn larger than objects in the background.

True | False

33. The way we show objects in proportion to one another as they recede to a distant point.

A.    Contrast
B.    Foreshortening
C.    Linear Perspective
D.    Form

34. The placement of the horizon line depends on the artist’s point of view.

True | False

35. Flat, filbert, round, and bright are all standard art brush shapes used for oil painting.

True | False

36. When artists think about their composition, they are thinking about __________.

A.    a technique used by modern artists to make designs by attaching two and three dimensional objects to a flat surface
B.    lines that show the edges of forms and shapes in the simplest way
C.    ordered arrangement of elements in a work of art, usually according to the principles of design
D.    a system of drawing to give the illusion of depth on a flat surface

37. The area on a surface that reflects the most light is a _________.

A.    shadow
B.    highlight
C.    tone
D.    hue

38. The three basic properties of an artwork are composition, content and __________.

A.    principles of art
B.    subject
C.    elements of art
D.    perspective

39. When you paint you should always clean your brush to __________.

A.    know what brush you are using
B.    share it with your friends
C.    keep it looking new
D.    keep it clean so your colors stay beautiful

40. The rule of thirds dictates __________.

A.    that three colors should be used in an artwork
B.    the design be limited to three objects
C.    where the main subjects in a work of art should be placed
D.    the canvas should be divided into three main sections

More Quizzes to Test Your Knowledge of the Fine Arts

Can You Name These Famous Paintings From History?

Do You Know The Definition Of These Art Terms?  

Test Your Knowledge of Art Appreciation

Test Your Knowledge of COLOR Theory

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Elements and Principles of Design

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: PaintingYou are here.

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Have a question?

If you have a question about this painting, please contact us and we’ll be happy to answer any of your questions.

Teresa’s Insider News

Be the first to know! Sign up here to be among the first to receive sneak peeks of recently completed paintings, new announcements and other updates at the art studio.

Teresa has an insider newsletter and it’s FREE! This is her way of keeping her friends up to date by giving you sneak peeks of new paintings she completes, as well as other announcements before they are made public. Her newsletter is published every other month, so be sure to get on her mailing list. You don’t want to miss a thing!

Thanks for taking this quiz!

Feel free to share this with your friends.


Answers: 1D, 2B, 3A, 4B, 5A, 6D, 7C, 8F, 9T, 10T, 11T, 12T, 13C, 14A, 15C, 16D, 17B, 18B, 19A, 20B, 21F, 22F, 23B, 24T, 25A, 26B, 27F, 28C, 29T, 30C, 31F, 32T, 33C, 34T, 35T, 36C, 37B, 38B, 39D, 40C

UPDATED: 29 March 2021


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Test Your Knowledge of COLOR Theory

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tube of oil paintTest your knowledge of color theory as it applies to fine art. Take this simple 50 question quiz by writing your answers on paper, then check your answers at the end of the quiz. Don’t peek!

1. Color is  _______.

A.    a design principle
B.    an element of art
C.    a value
D.    none of the above

2. What color can not be made by mixing any other color?

A.    Yellow
B.    Green
C.    Purple
D.    Gray

3. What are the primary colors?

A.    Red-orange, red-purple, yellow-orange, yellow-green, blue-green, and blue-purple
B.    Green, orange, and purple
C.    White, black, gray, and brown
D.    Red, blue, and yellow

4. The choice of colors used in a design plan is called a _______.

A.    color spectrum
B.    color wheel
C.    color scheme
D.    color mix

5. A circular chart used to show color relationships is called a _______.

A.    color ray
B.    color wheel
C.    color circle
D.    color scheme

6. Secondary colors are created by mixing two _______.

A.    neutral colors
B.    complementary colors
C.    primary colors
D.    intermediate or Tertiary colors

7. Colors that are different in lightness and darkness are said to be _______.

A.    contrasting
B.    light in value
C.    dark in value
D.    bright and intense

8. What are the secondary colors?

A.    Red-orange, red-purple, yellow-orange, yellow-green, blue-green, and blue-purple
B.    Green, orange, and purple
C.    White, black, gray, and brown
D.    Red, blue, and yellow

9. Which of the following are examples of cool colors?

A.    Orange, green and purple (or violet)
B.    Blue, green and violet (or purple)
C.    Yellow, blue and red
D.    White, black and brown

10.  Which of the following are examples of warm colors?

A.    Yellow, red, and orange
B.    Yellow, red and blue
C.    Yellow, green and blue
D.    Orange, purple and green

11. Yellow-orange, red-orange, and yellow-green are examples of _______ colors.

A.    intermediate or tertiary
B.    secondary
C.    primary
D.    triadic

12. _______ is another word for brightness of a color.

A.    Value
B.    Intensity
C.    Hue
D.    Complementary

13. What are the tertiary colors?

A.    Red-orange, red-purple, yellow-orange, yellow-green, blue-green, and blue-purple
B.    Green, orange, and purple
C.    White, black, gray, and brown
D.    Red, blue, and yellow

14. Monochromatic colors are all the colors (tints, tones, and shades) of a single hue.

True | False

15. Complimentary colors are side by side on the color wheel.

True | False

16. To make a shade you would add _______ to a color.

A.    black
B.    white
C.    brown
D.    yellow

17. What words are used to describe color temperature?

A.    Light and Dark
B.    Hot and Cold
C.    Black and White
D.    Warm and Cool

18. Which colors will give you the greatest contrast?

A.    Red and blue
B.    Blue and green
C.    Red and green
D.    Green and yellow

19. How many colors are on the basic color wheel?

A.    Three primary and three secondary colors
B.    Three cool and three warm colors
C.    Three pairs of complementary colors
D.    All of the above

20. Analogous colors is another term for complementary colors.

True | False

21. Red and green are examples of complementary colors.

True | False

22. The color plan of red, yellow and blue is an example of a triad color scheme.

True | False

23. A related color scheme would be colors that are next to each other on the color wheel.

True | False

24. Tints of colors may be created by adding white. Pink is a tint of red.

True | False

25. Intensity refers to the purity of a hue.

True | False

26. Blue and orange are _______ colors.

A.    primary
B.    related or analogous
C.    secondary
D.    complementary

27. Red, yellow, and blue are _______ colors.

A.    primary
B.    related or analogous
C.    secondary
D.    complementary

28. Yellow, yellow-orange, orange are _______ colors.

A.    primary
B.    related or analogous
C.    secondary
D.    complementary

29. Red and green are _______ colors.

A.    primary
B.    related or analogous
C.    secondary
D.   complementary

30. Orange, green and violet (or purple) are _______ colors.

A.    primary
B.    related or analogous
C.    secondary
D.    complementary

31. Purple, blue, and red-violet are _______ colors.

A.    primary
B.    related or analogous
C.    secondary
D.    complementary

32. Colors that are across from each other on the color wheel are called ________ .

A.    intermediate or tertiary colors
B.    analogous colors
C.    color triad
D.   complementary colors

33. Three colors that are equal distance apart on the color wheel are called ________ .

A.    intermediate or tertiary colors
B.    analogous colors
C.    color triad
D.    complementary colors

34. Colors that are next to each other on the color wheel are called  ________ .

A.    intermediate or tertiary colors
B.    analogous colors
C.    color triad
D.    complementary colors

35. ________ are obtained by mixing secondary colors and primary colors.

A.    Intermediate or Tertiary colors
B.    Analogous colors
C.    Color triad
D.    Complementary colors

36. ________  are obtained by adding white to a hue.

A.    Neutrals
B.    Tints
C.    Secondary colors
D.    Shades

37. ________ are obtained by mixing two primary colors.

A.    Neutrals
B.    Tints
C.    Secondary colors
D.    Shades

38. ________ are obtained by adding black to a hue.

A.    Neutrals
B.    Tints
C.    Secondary colors
D.    Shades

39. Colors that go with all color plans — white, black, gray and brown — are called _______ .

A.    Neutrals
B.    Tints
C.    Secondary colors
D.    Shades

40. Blue, green and purple are cool colors.

True | False

41. All colors are made from red, blue, and yellow.

True | False

42. Yellow, red, and orange are cool colors.

True | False

43. Purple is an example of a primary color.

True | False

44. The lightness or darkness of a color is referred to as the _______ .

A.    shape
B.    value
C.    intensity
D.   texture

45. The brightness or dullness of a color is referred to as the _______ .

A.    shape
B.    value
C.    intensity
D.   texture

46. The pure hue is at its brightest _______ right from the bottle.

A.    shape
B.    value
C.    intensity
D.   texture

47. What color is the result of mixing red + yellow?

A.    Violet (Purple)
B.    Orange
C.    Brown
D.    Green

48. What color is the result of mixing red + blue?

A.    Violet (Purple)
B.    Orange
C.    Brown
D.    Green

49. What color is the result of mixing yellow + blue?

A.    Violet (Purple)
B.    Orange
C.    Brown
D.    Green

50. What color is the result of mixing red + yellow + blue?

A.    Violet (Purple)
B.    Orange
C.    Brown
D.    Green

Additional Reading

For more information on color theory see art article titled “Basic Art Element — Color” .

More Quizzes to Test Your Knowledge of the Fine Arts

Can You Name These Famous Paintings From History?

Do You Know The Definition Of These Art Terms?  

Test Your Knowledge of Art Appreciation

Test Your Knowledge of COLOR TheoryYou are here.

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Elements and Principles of Design

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Painting

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Have a question?

If you have a question about this painting, please contact us and we’ll be happy to answer any of your questions.

Teresa’s Insider News

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Answers: 1B, 2A, 3D, 4C, 5B, 6C, 7A, 8B, 9B, 10A, 11A, 12B, 13A, 14T, 15F, 16A, 17D, 18C, 19D, 20F, 21T, 22T, 23T, 24T, 25T, 26D, 27A, 28B, 29D, 30C, 31B, 32D, 33C, 34B, 35A, 36B, 37C, 38D, 39A, 40T, 41T, 42F, 43F, 44B, 45C, 46C, 47B, 48A, 49D, 50C


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Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Elements and Principles of Design

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an introduction to the principles of good design.Test your knowledge of the elements and principles of good design. Take this simple quiz by writing your answers on paper, then check your answers at the end of the test. Don’t peek!

1. The principles of good design are _______.

A.    color, depth, form, line, shape, space, texture, and value
B.    balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, proportion, repetition, simplicity, space, and unity
C.    all of the above
D.    none of the above

2. The elements of design are _______.

A.    color, depth, form, line, shape, space, texture, and value
B.    balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, proportion, repetition, simplicity, space, and unity
C.    all of the above
D.    none of the above

3. A type of balance in which both sides of a composition are balanced yet different is called _______.

A.    asymmetrical
B.    radial
C.    symmetrical
D.    geometric

4. Formal balance is another word for _______ balance.

A.    asymmetrical
B.    radial
C.    symmetrical
D.    geometric

5. Another word for “center of interest” is _______.

A.    focal point
B.    emphasis
C.    dominance
D.    all of the above

6. The choice of colors used in a design plan is called a _______.

A.    color spectrum
B.    color wheel
C.    color scheme
D.    color mix

7. A circular chart used to show color relationships is called a _______.

A.    color scheme
B.    color wheel
C.    color ray
D.    color circle

8. Colors that are different in lightness and darkness are said to be _______.

A.    contrasting
B.    light in value
C.    dark in value
D.    bright and intense

9. Which of the following can be used to create contrast in a composition?

A.    Smooth and rough textures
B.    Large and small shapes
C.    Plain areas against areas of patterns
D.   All of the above

10. _______ is another word for the brightness of a color.

A.    Value
B.    Intensity
C.    Hue
D.    Complementary

11. _______ is an element of art that refers to the sense of touch.

A.    Value
B.    Pattern
C.    Texture
D.    Shape

12. Negative space is the background or area surrounding an object in a composition.

True | False

13. Rhythm is created when various visual elements are repeated.

True | False

14. Variation is the use of the same lines, shapes, textures, and colors within an artwork.

True | False

15. Unity is obtained when all parts of a design are working together as a team.

True | False

16. Blue and orange are _______ colors.

A.    primary
B.    related or analogous
C.    secondary
D.    complementary

17. Red, yellow, and blue are _______ colors.

A.    primary
B.    related or analogous colors
C.    secondary colors
D.    complementary colors

18. Visual _______ is achieved when all parts of a composition have equal weight and appear to be stable.

A.    focal point
B.    unity
C.    balance
D.    pattern

19. _______ is a three-dimensional geometrical figure showing height, width and depth.

A.    Space
B.    Form
C.    Balance
D.    Line

20. Various art elements, like lines, colors, or shapes, that are repeated over and over in a planned way creates a _______.

A.    focal point
B.    unity
C.    balance
D.    pattern

21. The lightness or darkness of a color is referred to as the _______.

A.    shape
B.    value
C.    intensity
D.   texture

22. _______ may be geometric or organic.

A.    Shape
B.    Value
C.    Intensity
D.   Texture

23. _______ is the suggestion of action or direction, the path our eyes follow when we look at a work of art.

A.    Proportion
B.    Simplicity or visual economy
C.    Rhythm
D.    Movement

24. _______ is the relation of two things in size, number, amount, or degree within a design.

A.    Proportion
B.    Simplicity or visual economy
C.    Rhythm
D.    Movement

25. _______ is the elimination of all non-essential elements or details to reveal the essence of a form.

A.    Proportion
B.    Simplicity or visual economy
C.    Rhythm
D.    Movement

26. Symmetry, asymmetry and radial are all types of _______.

A.    Texture
B.    Balance
C.    Patterns
D.    Form

27. Creating a sense of visual oneness in a work of art is called _______.

A.    Form
B.    Value
C.    Unity
D.    Texture

28. _______ is a mark with greater length than width. They can be horizontal, vertical, diagonal, sraight, curved, thick, or thin.

A.    Color
B.    Shape
C.    Texture
D.    Line

29. Shapes and/or forms similar to those found in nature are _______.

A.    geometric
B.    pattern
C.    organic
D.    texture

30. The element of art referring to the emptiness or area between, around, above, below or within objects:

A.    color
B.    shape
C.    form
D.    space

31. Space is the element of art that helps create the illusion of a foreground, middle ground and background.

True | False

Additional Reading

For more information on this subject see:

Principles of Good Design

The Basic Elements of Art

More Quizzes to Test Your Knowledge of the Fine Arts

Can You Name These Famous Paintings From History?

Do You Know The Definition Of These Art Terms?  

Test Your Knowledge of Art Appreciation

Test Your Knowledge of COLOR Theory

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Elements and Principles of DesignYou are here. 

Test Your Knowledge of Fine Art: Painting

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Have a question?

If you have a question about this painting, please contact us and we’ll be happy to answer any of your questions.

Teresa’s Insider News

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Teresa has an insider newsletter and it’s FREE! This is her way of keeping her friends up to date by giving you sneak peeks of new paintings she completes, as well as other announcements before they are made public. Her newsletter is published every other month, so be sure to get on her mailing list. You don’t want to miss a thing!

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Answers: 1B, 2A, 3A, 4C, 5D, 6C, 7B, 8A, 9D, 10B, 11C, 12T, 13T, 14F, 15T, 16D, 17A, 18C, 19B, 20D, 21B, 22A, 23D, 24A, 25B, 26B, 27C, 28D, 29C, 30D, 31T


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Naming Your Artwork — Tips for the Fine Artist

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Here are some helpful tips for the fine artist on how to name their oil paintings and other works of art for exhibit or sale.

Tip #1: Keep it simple and keep it short. Don’t make your titles lengthy or complicated. Keeping it simple is always best. Make them easy to remember and understand. You’ll get better results that way.

Tip #2: Make your titles descriptive but not too personal. Instead of being ambiguous, consider naming your art something that describes exactly what is going on in the artwork. For example, you just completed a still life painting of some fruit and a candle on a bedside table, you could name it “Still Life with Fruit and Candle“.

In addition, you should not get too personal with your descriptive titles. If your painting is of your sister, it would not be best to name it “My Younger Sister Liz”. No one except a family member would be interested in buying such a painting, however, if you were to name it “Girl in the Red Dress“, then you have suddenly expanded your audience to more potential buyers.

Tip # 3: Include the name of the place when naming a painting of a particular location, especially if it is of a famous place. People want to know what or where the location is especially if it is a place they are familiar with, such as a familiar mountain range, hometown or old homestead where they grew up, etc. They will also want to know the name if it is a place they have visited before or hope to visit someday. Be sure to title the painting by location name if it is a famous landmark, national monument or park. Lastly if it is place not that familiar to many, but viewers can still curious enough to want to know the name.

Tip #4: Never name your painting “Untitled”. This can be a real deal stopper and a completely turn off to a potential customer. Viewers and potential buyers will have a hard time believing your work has value if your piece is simply called “Untitled”. Titles do matter to an art buyer!

Furthermore, if you are selling online, “Untitled” won’t get you anywhere in the search engines. Try typing the keyword “untitled” in Google or some other search engine and see what the results are. You’ll have a hard time finding your masterpiece in the SERPs (Search Engine Results Page). It will be buried so deep your painting will never get found.

Tip #5: For specific genres, like portraits, landscapes, historic events, etc., you might try the following:

    • Portraits — Include the individual’s name, add the date, and/or occupation.
    • Landscapes  —  Start with the location, maybe include the time of day, season of the year, and perhaps the mood as well. Example: “The Garden Tomb at Sunset
    • Historic event  —  Name it by what the event is, such as “First Man on the Moon“.

Tip #6: Start with the artwork’s focal point. This will usually be most the obvious elements of the piece. Titling your artwork after the focal point will help others to understand your artwork better, especially if your piece is an abstract.

Tip #7: Get others involved in the naming process. You can ask others for help naming your artwork or get their impressions on a title you are considering. What might sound like a clever title to you, could actually be a total flop. Getting feedback from others will help you choose just the right name for your masterpiece.

Tip #8: For multiple pieces in a series of paintings, you might want to name them sequentially. For instance if you wanted to do a series of snow paintings, they could titled “Fence Post in the Snow #1”, “Fence Post in the Snow #2”, and “Fence Post in the Snow #3” etc. You get the idea. Or you can give them all similar names like I did in my Peggy’s Cove series. I simply named these “Peggy’s Cove“, “Return to Peggy’s Cove” and “Peggy’s Cove Revisited“.

Have a question?

If you have a question about this painting, please contact us and we’ll be happy to answer any of your questions.

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Teresa has an insider newsletter and it’s FREE! This is her way of keeping her friends up to date by giving you sneak peeks of new paintings she completes, as well as other announcements before they are made public. Her newsletter is published every other month, so be sure to get on her mailing list. You don’t want to miss a thing!

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Basic Art Element — Space

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Space is one of the basic elements of art. It refers to the distance between or the area around and within shapes, forms, colors and lines. Space can be positive or negative. It includes the background, foreground and middle ground. Both positive and negative space can play important roles in the overall success of a work of art. By understanding the difference between the two, you will:

    • Become better at designing unified compositions.
    • Be more successful in visually communicating your story.
    • Gain important clues about the meaning of an art piece.

There are two types of space that exist within art — positive space and negative space. Positive space is the actual objects or shapes within an artwork and negative space is the space around and between those objects. A good way to demonstrate positive and negative space is by utilizing Rubin’s vase. (Refer to illustration.) As you can see the vase occupies what would be referred to as positive space and the space surrounding the vase is negative space. Notice how the negative space is forming silhouettes of two faces in profile.

positive and negative space

Positive Space

Positive space is the area or part of the composition that an object or subject occupies. It is usually the main focus of the painting, such as a vase of flowers, fruit, or candle in a still life, a person’s face in a portrait, or an animal in a wild life painting, or a building, trees and hills in a landscape. When used skillfully, positive space will add interest by enhancing and balancing the negative space in a composition.

Negative Space

Negative space is that empty or open space that surrounds an object. It helps to define the object, gives it some breathing room to prevent the painting from being too crowded and has a huge impact on how the art piece is perceived.

An interesting thing about negative space is it can be used to prompt viewers to seek out subtle hidden images within the negative space causing your design to get more attention and to be remembered while other less interesting works aren’t.

Why is negative space so important?

  1. It can add interest and is an excellent way to draw attention to your works of art. A good balance between great negative space and intrigue will cause the viewer to desire more time looking at your work of art.
  2. It can draw the viewer in giving them a sense of inclusion because they discovered a subtle hidden message or image in the composition. Even though it may be a simple composition, great negative space reveals there is more to the piece than first meets the eye making it a more rewarding experience for the viewer.
  3. It gives the eye a “place to rest,” thereby adding to the subtle appeal of the composition. The equal amounts of both negative and positive is considered by many to be good design.

Questions

  1. Does a negative space have shape?
  2. In what ways is negative space important to the overall success of a composition?

Additional Information

Principles of Good Design: Space

Your Next Art Lesson

If you enjoyed this lesson, be sure to check out another one in this series.

The Basic Elements of Art (Introduction)

Basic Art Element — Color, Part 1

Basic Art Element — Color, Part 2

Basic Art Element — Line

Basic Art Element — Space

Basic Art Element — Texture

Basic Art Element — Value

More Art Lessons

Good Design Principle: An Introduction

Good Design Principle: Balance

Good Design Principle: Contrast

Good Design Principle: Emphasis

Good Design Principle: Movement

Good Design Principle: Proportion

Good Design Principle: Space

Good Design Principle: Visual Economy

Good Design Principle: Unity

Have a question?

If you have a question about this painting, please contact us and we’ll be happy to answer any of your questions.

Teresa’s Insider News

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Teresa has an insider newsletter and it’s FREE! This is her way of keeping her friends up to date by giving you sneak peeks of new paintings she completes, as well as other announcements before they are made public. Her newsletter is published every other month, so be sure to get on her mailing list. You don’t want to miss a thing!

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UPDATED: 26 October 2020


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