First Man on The Moon

Astronaut Neil Armstrong painting

© Copyright 2012 – Present

Size: 24″ x 18″
Support: Gallery wrap stretched canvas
Description: A depiction of man’s first lunar landing. This painting will not need a frame as the representation extends around the edges of the canvas.


Purchasing Information
$420 Plus S/H





Artist Comments: This painting is a tribute to American Astronaut Neil Armstrong. On July 20, 1969 Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were the first men to land a spacecraft on the moon. However, it was Armstrong who took that first step onto its surface. A third crew member, Michael Collins, was alone orbiting the Moon in the Command Module Columbia awaiting their return.

Armstrong was commander for the Apollo 11 lunar mission. In this historic mission Armstrong became a global hero the instant he made that “one giant leap for mankind” with a small step onto the surface of the moon. The crew of Columbia took a TV camera with them so the world could watch as they spent about 2 hours on the lunar surface collecting soil samples and conducting a few experiments.

I was just a young girl the day Armstrong walked on the moon and I don’t remember a lot about it, but I do remember watching the footage on TV. During that time Armstrong and Aldrin also took photographs, unveiled a plaque to commemorate their flight, and planted the flag of the United States.

Armstrong died August 25, 2012 at 82 years of age. I finished this painting a few months before his death.

You can read more about Astronaut Neil Armstrong at NASA’s web site: Neil A. Armstrong.

To find out more about the Apollo 11 mission visit NASA’s web site: Apollo 11 – First Footprint on the Moon.

See another space art painting I did called First Footprint on the Moon.


Principles of Good Design: Movement

movement in artMovement is the principle of good design which gives the artist control over what the viewer sees next. Using this principle, the artist can create the path our eyes will travel as we look at a work of art. For example, our attention is first captured by the main focal point and then it proceeds to move around the composition as one element after another catches our attention.


African art “Camelthorn Trees of Africa”
Landscape painting by Teresa Bernard
24″ x 24″
Oils on stretched canvas

>> More info


Defining Movement in Art

Movement shows action and creates a feeling of motion within a composition. It also serves as a guide to direct the eye from one element to the next. An artist controls and forces the progression of the viewer’s eyes in and around the composition of the painting using eye travel. For instance, the eye will travel along an actual path such as solid or dotted line, or it will move along more subtle paths such as from large to smaller elements, from dark to lighter elements, from color to non-color, from unusual to usual shapes, etc.

Repetition and Rhythm

Movement also contributes to the overall unity in a piece by creating a relationship between the various components of a work. There are various ways to create this relationship, it can be done by using repetition and  rhythm.

rhythm in artThe use of repetition to create movement occurs when elements which have something in common are repeated regularly or irregularly thereby creating a visual rhythm. Repetition doesn’t always have to mean exact duplication either, however, it does require similarity or near-likeness. Slight variations to a simple repetition are good, as this will add interest. Repetition tends to relate elements together whether they are touching or not.

Rhythm is the result of repetition which leads the eye from one area to another in direct, flowing, or staccato movement. It can be produced by continuous repetition, by periodic repetition, or by regular alternation of one of more forms or lines. A single form may be slightly changed with each repetition or be repeated with periodic changes in size, color, texture, or value. A line may regularly very in length, weight, or direction. Color may also be repeated in various parts of the composition in order to unify the various areas of the painting.

Movement Through Action

implied movement in artMovement can also be created by action. In two-dimensional works of art, action must be implied. Implied action in a painting creates life and activity. This is best illustrated by the direction the eye takes along an invisible path created by an arrow, a gaze, or a pointing finger. Action can also be indicated by the “freeze frame” effect of an object in motion, such as a bouncing ball suspended in mid air, a jogger about to take that next step, or a swimmer taking a dive, etc. You get the idea.

Examples of the Effective Use of Movement

Movement in this painting is created in several ways. You see it as your eye travels from the little girl on the blanket and moves up the stairs. You will also see repetition in color. The color of the building is very similar to the blanket the child is sitting on. In addition, the stairs create a repetition effect.

 

 

repetition in designRepetition creates the movement in this painting. The color of the gowns is repeated leading the eye into the painting. The pattern on the floor also creates repetition. You also get the feeling of movement created by implied action.

 

 

Questions

  1. What are some specific ways movement can be created in a composition?
  2. In what way does movement create unity in a work of art?

Your Next Art Lesson

If you enjoyed this lesson, be sure to check out another one in this series.

Good Design Principle: An Introduction

Good Design Principle: Balance

Good Design Principle: Contrast

Good Design Principle: Emphasis

Good Design Principle: Movement

Good Design Principle: Proportion

Good Design Principle: Space

Good Design Principle: Visual Economy

Good Design Principle: Unity

Principles of Good Design: Proportion

proportion1

Proportion in art is the relationship of two or more elements in a composition and how they compare to one another with respect to size, color, quantity, degree, setting, etc.; i.e. ratio.

When two or more elements are put together in a painting a relationship is created. This relationship is said to be harmonious when a correct or desirable association exists between the elements. This refers to the correct sizing and distribution of an element which then creates good proportion. Good proportion adds harmony and symmetry or balance among the parts of a design as a whole.


painting with covered wagon“Covered Wagon on the Prairie”
Western landscape by Teresa Bernard
20″ x 16″
Oils on stretched canvas

>> More info


When the principle of proportion is applied to a work of art it is usually in the relationship of size. That is, the size of one element as compared to the size of another related element within the same composition. In this instance, a comparison of size is made between the:

  • Height, width and depth of one element to that of another
  • Size of one area to the size of another area
  • Size of one element to the size of another element
  • Amount of space between two or more elements

bad-proportionProportion is usually not even noticed until something is out of proportion. When the relative size of two elements being compared seems wrong or out of balance it is said to be “out of proportion”. For example if a person has a head larger than their entire body, then we would say that they were out of proportion.

 

good-proportionThere are several ways for achieving good proportion:

  1. Place like elements together which are similar in character or have a common feature.
  2. Create major and minor areas in the design, as equal parts can quickly become monotonous and boring. However, the differences in size must not be so great as to make the parts appear unrelated and therefore, out of harmony with each other.
  3. Arrangement of space should be in such a way that the eye does not perceive a standard mathematical relationship. Dividing up the composition in halves, quarters and thirds should be avoided. A subtle relationship creates a more dynamic design.
  4. Create harmony in the art work. Harmony is an agreement between the shapes that stresses the similarities of all parts. In other words, the shape of one part should “fit” the shape of the adjoining elements. Shapes should “fit” properly in their positions and spaces.

harmony

Examples of the effective use of Proportion

proportion2There is a real sense of proportion in the painting left. Without the effective use of the principle of proportion you would not experience the majesty of the mountain in the background.

 

 

 

proportion5 In this painting right proportion is instrumental in emphasizing the distance of the ship in the background.

 

 

 

Examples of the effective use of Harmony

harmony1It is easy to observe harmony in action in nature. Notice how the individual wedges “fit” the orange painting.

 

 

 

harmony2

 

In the coat of arms we observe how the different elements “fit” together perfectly inside each other to create harmony.

 

 

Questions

  1. How is good proportion created?
  2. What does good proportion bring to a painting?

Your Next Art Lesson

If you enjoyed this lesson, be sure to check out another one in this series.

Good Design Principle: An Introduction

Good Design Principle: Balance

Good Design Principles: Contrast

Good Design Principle: Emphasis

Good Design Principle: Movement

Good Design Principle: Proportion

Good Design Principle: Space

Good Design Principle: Visual Economy

Good Design Principle: Unity

Principles of Good Design: Visual Economy

simplicity in artVisual Economy in art, also known as simplicity, is the omitting of all non-essential or unimportant elements and details which don’t really contribute to the essence of the overall composition in order to emphasize what is important. Simplicity suggests that a good composition is the most simple solution to the design problem. Much of the beauty and skill in good design focuses on what is left out, rather than trying to include everything you can. The secret to a great composition is in knowing when to stop; when to put the brush down, stand back and say “that’s just about right”.


Hay bales oil on canvas“Life in Texas — Round Hay Bales”
Landscape by Teresa Bernard
16″ x 20″
Oils on stretched canvas

>> More info


Keeping it Simple is a Key to Good Design

Good design means as little design as possible. It involves a paring down to only the essential elements required to achieve the desired effect. Restraint and simplicity are key in the creation of good design. There are no rules for using economy, if an element works in the composition with respect to the whole design, it should be kept. If it distracts from the desired effect, it should be re-evaluated for its purpose. Never use anything for its own sake, always consider and justify its inclusion for the contribution it makes to achieve the overall design effect.

Examples of the effective use of Simplicity

visual economySimplicity is suggested in the painting of the cowboy by zooming in thus eliminating the extra surrounding elements that would otherwise detract from the main focus of the painting.

 

 

There is simplicity in the design of the buildings in the painting right. Detail has been left out to call your attention to the unique architecture.

 

 

In the painting of Egypt detail has been deliberately left out so the shapes rather than the features become the areas of interest.

 

 

 

minimal designIn the painting on the right the background and clothing are done in a very simplistic manner so that the viewer’s attention is drawn to the face of Mary and that of baby Jesus. More detail would have been a distraction.

 

 

Questions

  1.  Why is visual economy in art so important to a great composition?
  2. In what situations would an artist want to use this principle of good design?

Your Next Art Lesson

If you enjoyed this lesson, be sure to check out another one in this series.

Good Design Principle: An Introduction

Good Design Principle: Balance

Good Design Principle: Contrast

Good Design Principle: Emphasis

Good Design Principle: Movement

Good Design Principle: Proportion

Good Design Principle: Space

Good Design Principle: Visual Economy

Good Design Principle: Unity